KCIIE Membership Reception

Kansas City IIE Chapter’s 2015 Membership Reception and Social Media Advice for Career Management

Tuesday, April 28, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM (CDT)
Art Factory
5621 W 135th St #2630
Leawood, KS 66223

RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/kciie-membership-reception-and-social-media-advice-for-career-management-tickets-16414984661?ref=enivtefor001&invite=NzgwNDg1Mi9hcmFuaG8yQGhhbGxtYXJrLmNvbS8w&utm_source=eb_email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=inviteformal001&utm_term=eventpage

Are you interested in some tips on how to manage your career and leverage social media to do so?                  Have you wondered what your KCIIE chapter has been up to and what they have planned this year?                   Are you intrigued by the lastest trendy art gallery in Kansas City, located in the new PrairieFire district?              Did you let your membership with IIE lapse?

If you answered YES to any of these questions, then you should join the KCIIE chapter and Dan Chojnacki and Ann Mann of Lee Hecht Harrison for an evening of networking, renewed and new social and professional connections, and some career tips!  Please come out at join us at the trendy new Art Factory in PrairieFire!

Event Details
  • We will serve heavy hors d’evours, water, soda, and a cash bar will be available
  • Register by April 17th and receive a complimentary drink ticket when you arrive
  • KCIIE members who bring a non-IIE member will receive a complimentary drink ticket for both themselves and their guest!
  • Door prizes will be available to members and to nonmembers who join IIE that evening
  • One free Membership to IIE
  • 2 – $100 Amazon Gift Cards
  • $50 Quiktrip Gift Cards
  • $25 Panera Gift Cards
Event Schedule

6:00-6:30    Check-in and Networking
6:30-7:30    Welcome and Speaker Presentation
7:30-7:45    Wrap up from sponsor, Chris Benson of AXA Advisors
7:45-8:00    Door Prize Drawings

Event Sponsor

The event is sponsored by Chris Benson of AXA Advisors

About Our Speakers

Dan Chojnacki
Senior Vice President, Area Director

Dan Chojnacki is Senior Vice President for Lee Hecht Harrison’s Midwest Region. Dan brings over 20 years of direct business experience to this consulting and managerial position including 17 years at Hallmark Cards, Inc. where he held positions of increasing responsibility including the National Accounts Manager and Regional Sales Manager (where he managed the largest region nationally in sales and personnel). He also held various training manager positions where he instituted management development programs and then coordinated their implementation on both local and national levels. Dan currently has market leadership responsibility for corporate clients and client-facing teams in Kansas City, Omaha, St. Louis and Denver.
Throughout his career, Dan in a direct managerial role has been actively involved in one-on-one in-depth career counseling developing human resources into key managerial level positions while building effective, cohesive, productive and positively focused teams.

Ann Mann
Regional Account Manager, Sales Support and Marketing

Ann Mann brings over 20 years of Human Resources, Learning & Development and Retail Sales Management experience to Lee Hecht Harrison in her role as Regional Account Manager, Sales Support and Marketing.
Throughout her 20 year career with Saks Fifth Avenue, Ann had responsibilities in Human Resources, Learning & Development, and Sales Management. Her strong background in service, selling and training enabled her to travel to other Saks locations throughout the country participating in new store openings and training events. Ann also supported Department Managers with coaching, team building, employee retention & engagement and organizational skills to develop their business unit and improve customer satisfaction.
As a Lee Hecht Harrison certified facilitator, Ann is able to deliver the Milestones Material, What’s Next, Moving Forward with Change, and Developing Personal Resilience to all levels of clients and employees. Ann assists in the faciliation of Job Search Work Teams and conducts weekly Linkedin training.
Ann is a member of several Human Resources Organizations and serves on committees and boards including:EPN—Board Member; SHRMJC—Board Member; and SHRM.

Advertisements

Career Development

Beware of the Top 5 Interview Mistakes
By Deb Walker,  www.AlphaAdvantage.com
We’ve all heard stories of job candidates who looked great on paper but who were absolute disasters in person. With fewer interview opportunities available in our competitive job market, it’s essential to make the best possible first impression. Learn from the mistakes of others and avoid these top five worst interview blunders:

1. Not preparing for the tough interview questions. Like every job seeker, you probably have your own set of tough interview questions you hope will never be asked. The best strategy is to prepare ahead of time with answers to ALL of these questions. A career coach can be a great resource for helping you work out suitable answers with a positive spin on negative or challenging career situations.

2. Failure to match communication styles. Making a great first impression is easier to do when you communicate effectively with your interviewer. The best way to do this is
by mirroring his or her communication style. Allowing your interviewer to set the tone of the conversation will put him or her at ease and makes the conversation flow more naturally.
For instance:

  • If the interviewer seems all business, don’t attempt to loosen him or her up with a joke or story. Be succinct.
  • If the interviewer is personable, try discussing his or her interests. Personal items on display in the office can be a clue.
  • If asked a direct question, answer directly. Then follow up by asking if more information is needed.

3. Talking too much.In my recruiting days, I abhorred over-talkative candidates, and so did most of my client employers who interviewed these candidates. Over-talking takes several forms:

  • Taking too long to answer direct questions. The impression: This candidate just can’t get to the point.
  • Nervous talkers. The impression: This candidate is covering up something or is outright lying.

To avoid either of these forms of over-talking, practice answering questions in a direct manner. Using role-playing in preparing for your interview will help you avoid excessive, nervous talking.

4. Saying negative things about your current or past employers or managers. Even if your last boss was Attila the Hun, avoid stating your ill feelings about the person or work situation. No matter how reasonable your complaints, your negative comments will be viewed as disrespect towards your boss. When faced with the challenge of talking about former employers, make sure you are prepared with a positive spin on your experiences.

5. Giving away too much salary and earnings information. Candidates often weaken their future earning potential by speaking too freely about their current income. No matter the official salary range of the position you are interviewing for, your current earnings have an enormous effect on the size of the offer. Investing in a career coach to help you answer salary questions can add thousands of dollars to your new job offer.

You already know that it takes a strong resume that sets you apart as a candidate of choice to be invited for an interview. The next step is to hone your interviewing skills to actually win job offers. Polishing your interviewing skills can mean the difference between getting the job and being a runner-up.

Used with permission for KCIIE newsletter.